• THE LAST NEANDERTHAL

    Claire Cameron’s The Last Neanderthal presents readers with the dual narrative of two women separated by 40,000 years. While these two characters are different in almost every conceivable aspect, they both serve to illustrate themes: the indomitable human spirit; female empowerment; and the nature of humanity.

  • THE HAUNTING OF VANCOUVER ISLAND

    This spellbinding collection of folklore is set in one of the most naturally stunning parts of “supernatural” British Columbia. From ethereal forests to mystical coastlines, Vancouver Island is renowned for its visual and spiritual influences on inhabitants and visitors alike.

  • SODOM ROAD EXIT

    If you could replace the ghost in your lesbian supernatural romance with a living character and nothing substantial changed, you might not be writing a ghost story. Lambda Literary Award-winner Amber Dawn's second novel is many things – a compelling family drama, a fascinating piece of historical fiction, a thoughtful examination of the scars left by abuse, and a surprisingly sweet romance – but it is not a ghost story.

  • SEAS OF SOUTH AFRICA

    If the Life of Pi is one of your favourite novels, then you will love Philip Roy’s Seas of South Africa,– the sixth book of the Submarine Outlaw Series. Seas of South Africa is categorized as young adult, but the exotic locale will intrigue readers of all ages. The enchanting voice of the narrator-protagonist takes us on many exciting adventures on the high seas and onto the Dark Continent.

  • DON’T TELL ME WHAT TO DO

    Don't Tell Me What to Do by Dina Del Bucchia is a hilarious debut story collection both ridiculous and mundane. As the title implies, the author showcases women who are sick and tired of being told what to do and proving that “it's so easy to get in trouble if you demand every ounce of a person.”

  • WE ALL LOVE THE BEAUTIFUL GIRLS

    We All Love the Beautiful Girls is literary fiction by Joanne Proulx - a heart wrenching, emotional rollercoaster that captures the privileged lives of matron Mia Slate, her husband Michael, and Finn, their damaged son who is in love with a girl he cannot have.

  • WATERMARK

    Christy Ann Conlin’s short fiction collection of 11 mesmerizing stories returns to characters in her previous gothic novels Heave (2002) and The Memento (2016), and to Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley and the communities between two mountains on the Bay of Fundy. Its rural, isolated location is familiar to Conlin who lives there with her husband (Wolfville’s Conundrum press owner) and three sons, and has grown out of challenges as foreboding as her titles – “Full Bleed,” “Dead Time,” and “Beyond All Things Is the Sea.” Her own experience with divorce, multiple family deaths, a bout with cancer, contrast her inventions – teen murderers, runaway brides, single and absent parents, devilish…

  • TRICKSTER DRIFT

    Eden Robinson’s Trickster Drift is one step from a literary hat-trick, the second book in what she promised would be a trilogy so she begins by bringing new readers up to speed without overt to recap before matching the thrills of the first instalment.

  • TIGER, TIGER

    The opening of “Outside,” a story about a museum that houses selections from all of human history, is an example of the abstract nature of Johanna Skibsrud’s short story collection, Tiger, Tiger. Skibsrud, winner of the 2010 Scotiabank Giller Prize for her novel The Sentimentalists, conjures up narratives each more speculative than the last.

  • THE LOST LETTER

    Emotionally charged, witty, and surprising- Catherine Greenwood’s second published collection of poetry, The Lost Letters, allows the reader to appreciate the long-ago love story of Heloise and Abelard with a modern twist. Greenwood explores forbidden, separated love. Heloise and Abelard were driven apart after they were discovered having an uncsanctioned relationship in the 12th century.